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Uzair attempted to help another Pakistani, Majid Khan, an al-Qaeda operative, gain access to the United States via immigration fraud.Khan is said to have been in contact with 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheik Mohammed and planned to bomb underground storage tanks at Maryland gas stations.[18] Uzair was convicted and sentenced to 30 years in prison.Paracha was arrested in Bangkok, Thailand, on July 8, 2003, through the efforts of the FBI and information provided by his son.He is believed to have had close ties to Khalid Sheik Mohammed, and Mohammed’s nephew Ammar al-Baluchi. citizen, originally from Kashmir, who was living in Columbus, Ohio.The best way to protect the United States from terrorism is to ensure a strong and capable domestic counterterrorism enterprise—and to understand the continuing nature of the terror threat. Most disturbingly, an increasing number of Islamist-inspired terrorist attacks are originating within America’s borders.The Boston Marathon bombing was the 59th publicly known terror plot against the United States since 9/11. The rise of homegrown extremism is the next front in the fight against terrorism, and Congress and the Administration must take it seriously.Despite being long recognized as a potential threat by law enforcement and intelligence, few Americans had considered the use of an improvised explosive device (IED) on American soil. Congress and the Administration should: In 2007, The Heritage Foundation began tracking post-9/11terrorist plots against the United States.And, due to only a few, and relatively small, attacks since 9/11, the public was not in a state of awareness. Heritage continuously refines and updates the available information, and in light of the Boston Marathon bombing, is now including not only thwarted plots, but those that have been successful.[1] In 2012, Heritage reported that at least 50 publicly known, Islamist-inspired terrorist plots against the homeland had been thwarted since September 11, 2001.

The group had also acquired surveillance and night vision equipment and wireless video cameras.[25] Two more men were later indicted in the plot: Ali al-Timimi, the group’s spiritual leader, and Ali Asad Chandia.

Bush, hijack airplanes, and provide support to al-Qaeda.

He was arrested while attending Medina University in Saudi Arabia, where he had joined an al-Qaeda cell.

Badat pleaded guilty in February 2005 to the plot to blow up the transatlantic flight on its way to the U. Before his conviction, Padilla had brought a case against the federal government claiming that he had been denied the right of habeas corpus (the right of an individual to petition his unlawful imprisonment). Goba and al-Bakri were sentenced to 10 years in prison, Taher and Mosed to eight years, Alwan to nine and a half years, and Galab to seven years.[14] Goba’s sentence was later reduced to nine years after he, Alwan, and Taher testified at a Guantanamo Bay military tribunal in the case against Osama bin Laden’s chief propagandist, Ali Hamza al-Bahlul.[15] All the men have served their jail sentences and are now living freely in western New York.[16] Recent reports indicate that Jaber Elbaneh, one of the FBI’s most wanted and often considered to be a seventh member of the Lackawanna cell, has been captured in Yemen. does not have an extradition treaty with Yemen.[17] 4. Uzair Paracha, a Pakistani citizen with permanent residency status in the U.

It remains to be seen whether he will be tried in the U. S., was arrested in March 2003 and charged with five counts of providing material and financial support to al-Qaeda.His plans, according to authorities, were to kill President Bush and then establish an al-Qaeda cell in the United States, with himself as the head.[23] He was convicted by an American court on November 22, 2005, and sentenced to life in prison on July 27, 2009, overturning a 2006 sentence of 30 years that was ruled to be too lenient.[24] 7. Eleven men were arrested in Alexandria, Virginia, for weapons counts and for violating the Neutrality Acts, which prohibit U. citizens and residents from attacking countries with which the United States is at peace. Upon further investigation, the remaining seven were indicted on additional charges of conspiring to support terrorist organizations.